| Accessibility Statement

Julie Rushmore

Ph.D.
University of Georgia
Odum School of Ecology
Athens, GA 30602

email: rushmore@uga.edu

Detailed Web Site →
Lab Web Site →

Education

Ph.D., University of Georgia
B.S.,  Duke University

Research Interests

  • Disease Ecology
  • Conservation Biology
  • Epidemiology
  • Behavioral Ecology
  • Primatology
  • Social Network Analysis
  • Public Health

Research Projects

My research focuses on how we can combine concepts from behavioral ecology and disease ecology to develop practical applicatoins for pathogen control in endangered wildlife species.

Honors and Awards

2013 Best Student Paper Award (Odum School of Ecology)
2013 National Conference Travel Award (University of Georgia)
2013 International Conference Travel Award (University of Georgia)
2012 James L. Carmon Award for Computational Research
2012 2nd Place for PhD Presentations at UGA Veterinary Research Symposium
2012 Dissertation Completion Award (University of Georgia)
2012 GHSU/UGA Student Exchange Award for Excellence in Biomedical Research
2012 1st Place for PhD Presentations at Odum School Graduate Student Symposium
2011 Acheivement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation Award
2011 International Conference Travel Award (University of Georgia)
2011 "Best Talk" Award at the Student Conference on Conservation Science in New York
2011 US Fish and Wildlife Service Conservation Beyond Borders Grant
2011 1st Place for PhD Presentations at Odum School Graduate Student Symposium
2010 Morris Animal Foundation Wildlife Research Training Grant
2010 Acheivement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation Global Impact Award
2010 Conservation International Primate Action Fund Grant
2009 US Fish and Wildlife Service Conservation Beyond Borders Grant
2009 Sigma Delta Epsilon/Graduate Women in Science Fellowship
2009 Fulbright Scholarship
2009 Animal Behavior Society E. O. Wilson Conservation Award
2009 Animal Behavior Society Student Research Grant
2009 American Society of Primatologists Conservation Grant
2009 1st Place for Proposed Research Presentations at Odum School Graduate Student Symposium
2008 Margot Marsh Biodiveristy Foundation Grant
2008 Odum School of Ecology Endowment Grant (University of Georgia)
2008 Veterinary Study Abroad Stipend (University of Georgia)
2007 Veterinary Medical Scientist Training Program Scholarship (University of Georgia)
2007 University-Wide Fellowship (University of Georgia)

Professional Affiliations

American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA)
American Association of University Women (AAUW)
Animal Behavior Society (ABS)
American Society of Primatologists (ASP)
Ecological Society of America (ESA)
Society for Conservation Biology (SCB)
Sigma Delta Epsilon/Graduate Women in Science (SDE/GWIS)

Selected Publications

Rushmore, J., Caillaud, D., Hall, R., Stumpf, R., Meyers, L., Altizer, S. Network-based vaccination improves prospects for disease control in wild chimpanzees. In prep.

Rushmore, J.
, Caillaud, D., Matamba, L., Stumpf, R. M., Borgatti, S. P., Altizer, S. (In Press). Social network analysis of wild chimpanzees with insights for disease transmission. Journal of Animal Ecology.

Han, B., Rushmore, J., Frische, A., Satterfield, D., Winternitz, J. (2012) Preempting pandemics [Review of the book The Viral Storm, by N. Wolfe]. Science. 337: 647-648.

Rushmore, J.
, Leonhardt, S.D., & Drea, C.M. (2012) Sight or scent: lemur sensory reliance in detecting food quality varies with feeding ecology. PLoS One, 7(8): e41558.


Julie Rushmore

My research examines how pathogen transmission impacts endangered animal populations. In recent decades, it has become increasingly clear that disease poses a major conservation concern for many threatened and endangered species. While its value is often overlooked, studying the interface of animal behavior, disease ecology, and conservation biology can provide many important insights. I believe that understanding how associative behaviors affect pathogen transmission will inform management decisions aimed at reducing disease and conserving species.