The Odum School emphasizes an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to research, integrating expertise and resources from other schools and colleges at UGA as well as other institutions.

A number of our faculty have joint appointments with other units on campus, including the College of Veterinary Medicine Department of Infectious Diseases, the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of genetics, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, the School of Law and the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. Our researchers are part of several centers and affinity groups, including the Georgia Initiative for Climate and Society, the UGA Water Faculty and the Faculty of Infectious Diseases. The interdisciplinary River Basin Center and Center for the Ecology of Infectious Diseases are led by Odum School faculty and administered through the Odum School.

Areas of Expertise

There are many experts in a variety of fields at the Odum School, but our core research areas are:

  • Aquatic ecology/Watershed ecology
  • Infectious disease ecology
  • Ecosystem ecology/Biogeochemistry
  • Evolutionary ecology/Biogeography
  • Sustainability science/Conservation ecology
Infectious Diseases Ecology
Infectious Diseases Ecology
Ecosystem Ecology / Biogeochemistry
Ecosystem Ecology / Biogeochemistry
Aquatics / Watershed Ecology
Aquatics / Watershed Ecology
Evolutionary Ecology / Biogeography
Evolutionary Ecology / Biogeography
Sustainability Science / Conservation Ecology
Sustainability Science / Conservation Ecology

Upcoming Events

SOCIAL: Odum Ice Cream Social

Aug. 30, 2018, 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Odum School of Ecology, Lawn

Latest News

John Drake featured on NCEAS podcast
John Drake featured on NCEAS podcast

John Drake was a featured guest on the July 18 edition of the NCEAS Portraits podcast

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Odum Research featured in Sierra Club Magazine online
Odum Research featured in Sierra Club Magazine online

Research by Odum School doctoral candidate Molly Fisher was covered in Sierra Club magazine in an article published online on July 16, 2018. The story reports on Fisher’s recent paper in Ecology and Evolution about the number of mammal species remaining to be discovered worldwide.

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Chelsea Sexton, BS ’14, helps identify mudworms as potential vectors of domoic acid, a neurotoxin, in the Gulf of Mexico
Chelsea Sexton, BS ’14, helps identify mudworms as potential vectors of domoic acid, a neurotoxin, in the Gulf of Mexico

A new paper coauthored by Chelsea Sexton, BS ’14, finds that a neuorotoxin produced by microscopic algae and consumed by mudworms at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico could end up in human diets via fish and shellfish.

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