Movement Ecology

Movement Ecology IconMovement ecology is the study of how organisms – either animals, plants or microorganisms – move within their environments or ecosystems, such as during daily activities like foraging, or when dispersing across the landscape, or during annual migrations.

Associated Faculty

Sonia Altizer
Sonia Altizer

Interim Dean
UGA Athletic Association Professor of Ecology
Graduate Program Faculty

Ecology building, Rm. 190
Office: (706) 542-9251
Fax: (706) 542-4819

Andy Davis
Andy Davis

Assistant Research Scientist
Graduate Program Faculty

Ecology building, Rm. 183
Office: (706) 542-8112
Fax: (706) 542-4819

Richard Hall
Richard Hall

Assistant Professor
Graduate Program Faculty
Joint appointment: Dept. of Infectious Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine

Ecology building, Rm. 137
Office: (706) 395-5350
Fax: (706) 542-4819

Ricardo Holdo
Ricardo Holdo

Associate Professor
Graduate Program Faculty

Ecology building, Rm. 188-B
Office: (706) 542-0075
Fax: (706) 542-3344

Takao Sasaki
Takao Sasaki

Assistant Professor
Graduate Program Faculty

Ecology building, Rm. 194D

Upcoming Events

Exhibition: Mollusca: Bivalvia

8:00 am

Ecology Building Atrium

Exhibition: Mollusca: Bivalvia

8:00 am

Ecology Building Atrium

Exhibition: Mollusca: Bivalvia

8:00 am

Ecology Building Atrium

Exhibition: Mollusca: Bivalvia

8:00 am

Ecology Building Atrium

Exhibition: Mollusca: Bivalvia

8:00 am

Ecology Building Atrium

Latest News

Team Science: UGA builds support for effective teams

The UGA Office of Research is building a support network to help faculty teams, including one led by Jeb Byers, win funding for high-impact research.

Read More >

Exploring the underwater world of Georgia’s creeks

One of Andrew Nagy’s favorite things to do is wade into a local creek, dip his trusty D-net into the water, and learn more about the creatures he pulls up.

Read More >

What causes disease outbreaks?

New research from the UGA CEID finds large-scale outbreaks of zoonotic diseases are driven by more and different factors than smaller ones.

Read More >