Davis discusses monarch butterflies on Living Lab Radio

Andy K. Davis, assistant research scientist in the Odum School, was featured on the podcast Living Lab Radio from NPR station WCAI on Jan. 14. Davis discussed recent research about

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Social animals have more parasite infections but lower infection-related costs

Animals living in large groups tend to have more parasites than less social animals do.

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Odum Research featured in Sierra Club Magazine online

Research by Odum School doctoral candidate Molly Fisher was covered in Sierra Club magazine in an article published online on July 16, 2018. The story reports on Fisher’s recent paper in Ecology and Evolution about the number of mammal species remaining to be discovered worldwide.

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Scientists predict number of undiscovered mammal species

There are probably 303 species of mammals left to be discovered by science, most of which are likely to live in tropical regions, according to a predictive model developed by a team of University of Georgia ecologists. Their research, recently published in Ecology and Evolution, could guide efforts to find and conserve these as-yet unknown species.

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Childhood sweethearts: Most whooping cranes pair up long before breeding age

Like many bird species, whooping cranes tend to mate for life. A new study led by researchers from the University of Georgia and of the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre has found that whooping cranes can form these lifelong attachments well before they are ready to start breeding.

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Not created equal: Wing structure helps female monarch butterflies outperform males in flight

Evidence has been mounting that female monarch butterflies are better at flying and more successful at migration than males, and researchers from the University of Georgia have now come up with an explanation but not one they expected.

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Model demonstrates link between species’ traits, competitive success, environmental conditions

Researchers at Yale University and the University of Georgia have developed and experimentally tested a new mathematical model based on the work of the late Ken Leonard, PhD ’10, that helps explain when and where species are likely to outcompete or coexist with one another.

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Genetic analysis reveals surprises about the monarch butterfly

A team of researchers, led by scientists at the University of Chicago and including Odum School Associate Dean Sonia Altizer, has published a study in Nature that reveals unexpected answers to the origins of monarchs and the genetic basis of their best-known traits.

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Species going extinct 1,000 times faster than in pre-human times, study finds

The Odum School’s John Gittleman and Patrick Stephens are contributors to a major new study that finds that species are going extinct today 1,000 times faster than during pre-human times?a rate an order of magnitude higher than the previous estimate.

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Study finds sexual selection predicts high variation in immune genes across mammal species

A study by University of Georgia ecologists has found that diversity in mammal immune system genes may have more to do with the opportunity to choose a mate than with exposure to parasites.

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