Genetic sequencing could contain future COVID-19 variants

Travel bans, relying on estimates of severity are largely ineffective at containing variants at their source New COVID-19 variants could potentially be contained where they arise using genetic sequencing, a new

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Odum School seeks two faculty members in infectious disease dynamics

The Odum School of Ecology is now accepting applications for two tenure-track faculty positions in infectious disease dynamics.

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Researchers developing tools to predict next pandemic

The CEID has received a $1 million NSF grant to develop infectious disease intelligence systems to predict–and help prevent–pandemics.

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Within the Walls: Ringtails at Zion National Park

Anna Willoughby is studying how the use of buildings is affecting diet, behavior and parasite infection in ringtails at Zion National Park.

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Christina Faust, Ecology BS/MS ’09, named to UGA 40 Under 40

Odum School alumna Christina Faust, BS/MS ’09, has been named to the 2022 class of 40 Under 40 by the UGA Alumni Association.

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Monarch butterflies increasingly plagued by parasites, study shows

North American monarch butterflies are increasingly plagued by a debilitating parasite, with major implications for their conservation.

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New model sheds light on wildlife disease transmission in urbanizing landscapes

Odum School researchers have developed mathematical models to understand how pathogen transmission in wildlife populations is altered by urbanization.

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Researchers explore drivers of algal blooms and host-parasite dynamics in local pond ecosystems

Alex Strauss is studying how algal blooms interact with host-parasite dynamics to influence biodiversity of zooplankton in local ponds.

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Drake, Saunt named Regents’ Professors

John Drake is one of two UGA faculty members named Regents’ Professors in recognition of the national and international reach of their scholarship.

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Parasitic worms in dogs, cats may jump into people

Parasitic worms that infect companion animals such as dogs and cats are more likely to make the leap into humans than are other worm species.

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