Ecosystem Engineers: Byers studies how marine organisms structure habitat

From beavers, which stop up flowing water to create the pools of water they depend upon, to oysters, which filter seawater and stabilize the shoreline to create more habitat, organisms

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Asymptomatic pertussis more common than believed

A new study from Boston University and UGA finds that asymptomatic pertussis may be far more common than previously believed.

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UGA researchers identify rules for predicting climate change effects on host-parasite interactions

New research from UGA identifies rules to help predict how host-parasite relationships will be shaped by global climate change.

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Targeted methods to control SARS-CoV-2 spread

New research from the CEID explores the effectiveness of different non-pharmaceutical intervention methods at slowing the spread of COVID-19.

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UGA to establish national NIH-funded center to fight flu

The National Institutes of Health has awarded UGA a contract to establish the Center for Influenza Disease and Emergence Research.

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2021 CURO Symposium features 18 ecology presentations

The 2021 UGA CURO Symposium features 18 original research presentations by Odum School of Ecology undergraduates.

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Light pollution drives increased risk of West Nile virus

By attracting birds and mosquitoes, light pollution is enhancing the likelihood that they’ll spread West Nile virus to animals and humans.

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Evolution of the fastest jaws in nature

GMNH associate Douglas Booher, BS ’98, explores the evolution of the trap-jaw mechanism in Strumigenys ants, which has resulted in one of the natural world’s fastest movements.

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Long-lived butterfly parasites can’t take the heat

Debilitating parasite spores that infect monarch butterflies can persist for years at cool temperatures, but are knocked out by heat.

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Disease Detectives

Center for the Ecology of Infectious Diseases researchers are working toward predicting future outbreaks by studying how hosts and parasites interact in the wild.

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