Study reveals an unexpected role of fire in longleaf pine forests

Frequent fire is needed to maintain the structure of longleaf pine forests, but may also be removing excess nitrogen from these ecosystems.

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UGA researchers to present at 2019 ESA annual meeting

Researchers affiliated with the UGA Odum School of Ecology will present their work at the 2019 Ecological Society of America annual meeting.

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Parasites affect host responses to environmental change

Ignoring the role of parasites may lead to misinterpretation of organism responses to environmental change.

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Women in Science supporting the next generation

Women in Science at UGA, founded 5 years ago by Ecology PhD students Anya Brown and Cecilia Sanchez, promotes equality and diversity in STEM.

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Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks

A new statistical method could help officials predict disease reemergence for preventable childhood infections like measles and pertussis.

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Molly Fisher’s research featured in Discover Magazine

The January/February 2019 issue of Discover Magazine featured research by Odum School doctoral candidate Molly Fisher.

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The sicker the better: Parasites help their beetle hosts function more effectively

Horned passalus beetles infected with a nematode parasite are able to process wood 15% faster than uninfected beetles, according to new research from the Odum School of Ecology.

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New book explores ecological consequences of warming soils

A new textbook edited by UGA ecologist Jacqueline Mohan provides a comprehensive look at how plants, animals, microbes and their physical environment respond to warming soils.

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2019 CURO Symposium is April 8-9

The 2019 CURO Symposium, featuring 19 ecology student presenters, takes place April 8-9 at the Classic Center in downtown Athens.

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Ginseng in decline in the eastern United States

American ginseng is in decline thanks chiefly to range-wide overharvesting, but that trend could potentially be reversed by promoting and supporting ginseng cultivation.

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